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TLCD Architecture: Revit Tips for June

RevitTipOfTheWeek

To Pin or not to Pin by David Moyer

A quick tip for you this week on the fine art of pinning. Ever try to move something only to find it was pinned and you had to unpin it first? That of course is easily solved, but what about when you want to move some things but not others that are in the same area of your model?

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You can reverse the process and use the Pin Selected Elements Tool down in the bottom right of the application window to control what moves and what does not.

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For example you are reconfiguring a furniture layout, but when you select the elements to rearrange them you end up getting the floor below selected instead of the furniture you wanted.

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Oops – didn’t want to do that! So execute an undo and pin the floor right…

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However, this just keeps the floor from moving; it still is the thing getting selected when you are trying to select the furniture with a crossing selection. Now it just does not move on you, so at least you do not need to undo a command.

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So then how can you get those tables and chairs selected? One at a time? No there is a better way – The problem is that your Pin Selected Elements Toggle is not cooperating. (It is set to select pinned elements.)

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All you need to do is change the status of your Pin Selected Elements Toggle to not allow the selection of Pinned elements by clicking on it.

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The icon changes to now show a red “X” with the pin to let you know that pinned items will be ignored in selection processes. Now you can crossing select that furniture without a problem.

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This can be especially useful with CAD backgrounds. Also remember to check the Pin Selection Toggle if you are having trouble selecting something in your model – it might be pinned and the toggle could be set to not allow pinned elements to be selected. Of course it could be one of those pesky design option situations or something else entirely, but at least this is one more thing you can check to help keep Revit frustration at bay.

Detectable Warning by Carl Servais 

I received an excellent question the other day about how to model detectable warning surfaces.  This is an excellent example where I like to refer to the Shakespearean adage:

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“To model or not to model, that is the question.”

In answer to the question of modeling detectable warning surfaces, I have never modeled the actual domes.  To represent the domes, I always use a surface pattern that works at a scale when shown in plan, but also looks decent in 3d views.  Since we typically have fairly flat sites and we have generally modeled the site topography as floors (for simplicity’s sake and because Revit’s topography tools are not great),  I have always divided the floor surface and painted the area of detectable warning with a material that has the dome pattern.  If you have modeled all the site elements with topographic surfaces, you will not be able to show surface patterns since Revit topographical surfaces do not support materials with surface patterns.  You should consider doing at least the hardscape elements as floors in order to produce surface patterns.

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For the detectable warning surface areas, I create a new material called “Truncated Domes” and set the surface pattern to “circles 2”, a model fill pattern that is in the TLCD template.

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Spelling / Abbreviations by Leslie Smith

Spelling

Nobody is perfect.

Soooo…use the handy dandy tool “Check Spelling” to confirm/correct text in your Revit projects.

From the Annotate Tab → select Check Spelling

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Note: Diligent visual checking is still required…Revit is looking at views not your sheet naming or project titles…since these are labels. It also doesn’t include keynotes.

Keynote Manager red underlines suspected misspellings so they can be easily spotted and corrected.

Abbreviations

We recently revised the abbreviations on the title sheet in the TLCD template. These are contained in a schedule format now, unfortunately you cannot insert schedules individually (as in insert from file like details).

BUT… there’s always a workaround…if you want to update existing projects to the new schedule you can:

1.     Start a new project (non workset)

2.     Insert from File the title sheet from one of the DSA or AHJ sheet sets (this brings in the abbreviation schedule)

3.     Then you can right click on the schedule in your browser – copy to clipboard.  Then paste into your current project.

4.     Place the schedule on your title sheet (it should lay down on sheet nicely split into 3 columns).

Please note that the new abbreviations do NOT include periods.

You can quickly swap out abbreviations project wide by using the Find/Replace feature (also on Annotation Tab)

(Again this doesn’t work in keynotes – but does for text notes – see below)

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If a project specific abbreviation is required, it should be noted on your title sheet in the drafting view “Project Abbreviations”.

For revising abbreviations in keynotes use the search / replace function in Keynote Manager.

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These few adjustments go a long way toward improving the quality and consistency of our production drawings.

Past Revit tips can be found here and here.

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