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TLCD Architecture: Revit Tips for September

Revit Tip of the Week, TLCD Architecture

Editing Requests | by David Moyer

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

This week’s tip comes from Steve Stafford’s Blog – Revit OpEd. Thinking this might be one of the reasons we find folks owning elements in Models when they have not been in those models recently.

http://revitoped.blogspot.com/2015/07/withdraw-your-editing-requests.html

In the past I wrote about how you can become the unwitting or accidental borrower of elements when you create an Editing Request but then close your local file before the request is resolved.

Therefore it is a good habit to Retract (withdraw) any Editing Requests you create before closing your Local file. If you form a habit of creating Editing Requests then also form the habit of Retracting any that are still pending when you leave the project for any reason.

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIMThis is not a request…

 

 

 

 

 

Ideate Explorer | by Leslie Smith

I watched a webinar on Ideate Explorer presented by Richard Taylor. He is a longtime Revit user (pre-autodesk) and refers to himself as a “technical evangelist”. His presentation was very informative and well presented. If you haven’t used this tool…you will – once you see what it can do.

At TLCD Architecture, Ideate Explorer is a Revit Add-in we all have in our add-ins tab.

For easy access you can add this to your Quick Access Toolbar (same thing for other tools you frequently use).

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

The webinar provided the top 10 tips

  1. Delete Imports – get rid of pesky .dwg files floating randomly in your project
  2. Audit worksets – by filter by workset you can see if components or elements are misplaced and relocate them.
  3. Audit groups – unfortunately groups sometimes don’t get named in a recognizable way…just what is “group 57” and where is it…
  4. Check Grids, Levels and Reference Planes. Ever place a family and it doesn’t show up cuz it’s hosted to Level 1..but you are working on Level 3…urggghhh
  5. Audit Views and Viewports
  6. Audit Revit Families including in-place creations.
  7. Cleanup Text and Dimensions
  8. Audit Keynotes and Revisions – Easy to get rid of Bid clouds and tags
  9. Review Model and Detail Lines
  10. Scan Element Count.

I especially find #1 Delete Imports useful…since these don’t show up in the browser and can be near impossible to find. There is a brief (1.5 minute) video available on Ideate website demonstrating this feature:  http://ideatesoftware.com/ideateexplorer/videos/

#7 Cleanup Text and Dimensions is very helpful especially when working on those projects we keep pulling forward from the past.

  • You can select all instances of a text style in your project and switch them all at once. Here’s how…
  • To use an old project as the basis for a new project, first open the old project as a detached from central. Save as your new project and Close.
  • Open again and create a local.  Open a new project using the TLCD template (not central just new project)
  • (so you have two projects open)
  • Go back to your Project Local file. From the Manage tab –  transfer project standards from the new project (created from the template).
  • Select the “check none” button and THEN…Select the things you want to transfer.
  • In this case we will choose “text types” and from the popup box choose “overwrite”.
  • Overwrite will catch some but not all font changes needed to match our current standard.

Here’s where Ideate Explorer comes in handy… TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

  • From the Add-ins tab or your Quick Access Toolbar select Ideate Explorer.
  • A box will pop up on your screen. This will float on top of your Revit window or can be pulled off to the side.
  • To globally change the text styles -> select display option “entire project”  -> scroll down to the “text notes” category.
  • All of the text styles used in your project are listed. Expand the tree by clicking on the + symbol.
  • For our example we will change two types 3/32” text (50) and TLCD 3/32” text (1922)
  • Check the boxes for those two text types and all 1972 instances will be selected.

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

Notice 1972 items have been selected…click ok. The Ideate Explorer box closes and you are back in Revit. (note with version 2016 the box doesn’t close and is more interactive)

The Revit properties box will now show those 1972 items are selected.

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

 

 

Using the dropdown arrow choose your new text type.

 

 

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

Voila! All 1972 instances changed in one quick moment.

Now if you activate Ideate Explorer and go to the text notes…you will not find the two old types listed. But will find your 1972 instances of TLCD 3/32” listed. The final cleanup step would be to purge unused text (Manage tab). I encourage you to explore “explorer”.

Here’s a link to the support page for more info. http://ideatesoftware.com/ideateexplorer/support/

Auditing your Revit File | by Carl Servais

We open Revit files all the time, and there’s always this mysterious Audit button that is left unchecked.

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

Should we be checkin’ that box?  Well, here’s some advice from Sash Kazeminijad, an Application Specialist from Ideate: http://ideatesolutions.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-importance-of-auditing-revit-models.html

The Importance of Auditing Revit Models

We have recently had several cases come through tech support in which folks were receiving error messages when attempting to edit their families in Revit 2015 R2. The message states “Family is corrupt and cannot be edited. Please reload the family to repair the project.” Receiving messages such as this one can be a little disconcerting, especially when you are in the middle of a large project. The fear is that the Revit model is corrupt or heading for corruption. In most cases, you may have to look for an archived version of the model or a local file to create a new Central model from, since most corrupt models are difficult to manually repair.

As we discovered, the recent rash of corrupt families within a Revit model has to do when a Revit model was upgraded to Revit 2015 R2. This corruption was more than likely due to the end user not selecting the “Audit” checkbox when opening (or upgrading) their Revit projects for the first time in Revit 2015 R2. Had the “Audit” option been selected, the family corruption issue may not have occurred.

The audit feature in Revit will scan, detect and sometimes fix corrupt elements within a Revit model. So when should you select the “Audit” option?

1. Whenever upgrading a Revit project from one version to another. For example, if you want to upgrade your Revit project from Revit 2015 to Revit 2016, select the “Audit” checkbox prior to opening it for the first time in the newest version.

2. Select the “Audit” checkbox when upgrading ALL models to Revit 2015 R2 for the first time.

3. If your Revit model is starting to take its time opening or you notice general performance issues, then auditing it may improve the time it takes to open your project.

4. If you receive messages such as “Data in file <revit project name.rvt. is corrupt and needs to be manually recovered” or “Family <family name here> is corrupt and cannot be edited. Please reload the family to repair the project.”

5. If you are doing any sort of Central File maintenance, including creating new Central Files.

Remember, it is always a good idea to make an archive copy of your model prior to Auditing and Upgrading to the next release of Revit. The reason being is in case the upgrade process introduces errors or corruption issues that cannot be repaired, or if you find a compelling reason to go back and work in the previous version of Revit.

Autodesk Certification | by Leslie Smith

It’s that time again…

Autodesk is offering Revit 2015 Certification testing for the discounted price of $45. This is a once a year deal – “Open Doors Certification Day”. The testing date is Friday October 2.

Here’s the link to Ideate:  http://ideateinc.com/educate/certification.html

Whether interested in certification or not it’s always good to invest in self-learning. This is a screen shot of the exam prep “roadmap” provided by Autodesk. It’s a good checklist to see where you are with your Revit skills.

TLCD Architecture, Revit Tips, BIM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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