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Posts tagged ‘Cardboard’

Brokers Open at Museum On the Square in Downtown Santa Rosa

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On Thursday September 17, local commercial brokerage firm Keegan & Coppin Company, Inc.  hosted a brokers open at Museum on the Square. TLCD Architecture team members joined the group of commercial real estate brokers to explain the history and evolution of the building as well as provide inspiration for future tenants by showing how we have designed our new office space on the second floor.

As part of the brokers open, TLCD shared a few pairs of Google Cardboard viewers with the attendees. To view the 3D renderings, click on an image below from your mobile phone, then insert your phone into the viewer. If you’re not at the brokers open or don’t have the Goggles, come stop by our office and we’ll show you how it works. For those of you with smart phones or tablets, you can also view the renderings but they will be in a dual pane view.

View the work space at TLCD Architecture’s new office at Museum on the Square

View the entry to TLCD Architecture’s new office at Museum on the Square

View the conference room at TLCD Architecture’s new office at Museum on the Square

We’re not only using this technology on our own office design, we’ve started using it for our clients as well. Below are 3D renderings of the American AgCredit headquarters project in Santa Rosa we created which allowed them to view their new space and helped inform their design decisions.

View the kitchen and employee lounge at the American AgCredit Headquarters designed by TLCD Architecture

View the kitchen and employee lounge at the American AgCredit headquarters

View the entry to the American AgCredit headquarters

 

View the staircase and wine barrel stave wall at the American AgCredit headquarters designed by TLCD Architecture

View the staircase and wine barrel stave wall at the American AgCredit headquarters

View the conference room at the American AgCredit headquarters designed by TLCD Architecture

View the conference room at the American AgCredit headquarters

 

Revit Virtual Reality…What?!

TLCD Virtual Reality

Get ready World….you’re about to change.

By Nick Diggins, Associate AIA

Recently, Carl, Phil and I watched a webinar about cloud rendering in Revit. I had seen this process emerge some months back and Carl and I briefly took a look at it. However, we quickly discovered a major drawback of not being able to use custom textures in the cloud. Out of the box texture mapping usually results in less than adequate representation of your design. Well guess what… you now can incorporate as many custom textures and material assets as you’d like!

Revit has been one of the slowest rendering engines out there, but I’ve always been impressed with its capabilities when it came to doing interior rendering for a native program. Time is a major factor in our business, and slow is a “no go”. A 12-20 hour rendering is not an uncommon thing with geometry heavy models, even with a render farm. Now with cloud rendering, we can send multiple views and let the magic and speed of the cloud to do its thing, while we keep working. An important thing to note is that renderings are vital for developing and sharing designs. Architects want to get their clients “into” the design, and a rendering can be great at starting to describe the space. Here’s the cool part, with Autodesk’s Cloud Rendering we are able to literally put the viewer in the space. It’s called stereo panorama (more about it here) and it’s transforming the way we use Revit with new levels of workflow for developing and sharing designs on the fly, not only with clients, but with each other.

I decided to give it a go and developed several views of 3d panoramas of a current office interior design. I had less than 6 hours for developing the scene materials, lighting and final render time, and little room for production time. I was able to fire off multiple draft renders during the process and keep working the scene similar to our backburner setup for 3dsmax. This was during normal work hours though so backburner was unavailable. Normally this type of work would have been rendered over a weekend but that was not the goal of the exercise. Once I had the developed views uploaded in the cloud, I had Autodesk sprinkle some magic over the top of them. Here’s where we take it up a few more notches, by pairing Cloud Rendering with a couple of iphones and pieces of cardboard, suddenly we were immersing the whole office into the design. You can stand and look all the way around you, with total freedom – and with your body rather than a computer mouse. Amazing!

Google Cardboard“Holy %&$#” was the phrase we heard from most of the office as first time viewers stood up to put on the goggles. It’s an amazing experience to witness the effect of going from sharing a 2D floor plan to actually putting people in the space. We are very excited  for this new design horizon and you can bet TLCD Architecture is going to keep pushing it’s abilities and usability. We look forward to what Autodesk might throw our way in the near future…3D walkthroughs maybe? Who knows, but TLCD is ready and excited for what might be brewing.

Rapid Prototyping: Captured on Video

 

This was the perfect project to take a test drive of Autodesk’s Dynamo for Revit and see what we could do.  Dynamo is a new, exciting, visual programming software that is similar to Grasshopper for Rhino.  We are actively beginning our exploration into computational design, and have already begun to see its benefits as we integrate Dynamo into TLCD’s BIM design process.  In this quick exercise we were able to quickly develop eight different iterations from our design.  Don’t miss the video and take a peek of us creating an addicting, generative design solution to share and discuss with the entire office and friends!

Check out an earlier blog post from December that started this conversation.  Rapid Prototyping: Exploring Multiple Design Options

 

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