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Posts tagged ‘Carl Servais’

TLCD Architecture: Revit Tips for January

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Door, Window, and Frame Types by David Moyer

Are you still making drafting views and using annotation lines to depict your door, window, and frame types? There are better ways. Ways that leverage the Building Information Model and assure that when a change happens these type views are automatically updated. Today I have two such options for you to consider: 1. Legends and 2. Elevation Views.

  1. Using a legend to create your door, window and frame types is very fast and easy, but It has some drawbacks; you cannot reference details from a legend and this method does not work for curtain walls. Thus if you want to refer to your window head detail from the Window Type View you can only add a text reference for this purpose, not leveraging the automatic update feature that Revit offers with regular views. For curtain walls we have no choice but to use method 2 detailed next. If you want to learn how to use a legend for your door, window, & frame types please refer to the following instructions: http://revitknowz.blogspot.com/2011/12/how-to-create-door-legends.html

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Carl’s Excellent Adventure: Leadership Santa Rosa Part 3

Carl-composite

My story about the second Leadership Santa Rosa program day, Government and Politics, truly began several months ago at the Class XXXII retreat where several of my classmates and I had a discussion about the reunification of Courthouse Square in Santa Rosa, an important and contentious project which has been in the works for many years.  That spirited discussion inspired me to complete our homework assignment by attending the City Council meeting in September where the City Council decided to move ahead with funding the project, and that meeting became a tipping point for me to speak out in support of the City Council’s decision by writing a letter to the local newspaper, the Press Democrat.

And so, with my freshly inspired spirit for civic engagement, I entered the City Council chambers again in October to learn all about government, policy, and politics during our program day.

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Carl’s Excellent Adventure: Leadership Santa Rosa Part 2

SelfieWithACow

The topic of Class XXXII’s first Leadership Santa Rosa program day was Agriculture.  After our fascinating pretour of a mushroom farm in Sebastopol, I was excited to see what the day would bring, but not so excited about starting at 6am.  Ugh!  I can’t complain too much though, since our first stop was the Bucher Dairy, a 2nd generation family-owned organic dairy farm on 360 acres near Healdsburg, where they are up every day at 1am to start milking the cows. Yikes!  They have 700 dairy cows producing milk for Clover Storneta, and in recent years planted a 40 acre vineyard to support their own wine label, Bucher.  I learned a lot about how the farm operates and how they have integrated new technology over time to increase efficiency, including creating their own “plate cooler” that works like a heat exchanger to passively cool the milk with stored water.

Our next stop was Santa Rosa Junior College’s Shone Farm for a panel discussion with Tony Linegar, the Sonoma County Agricultural Commissioner, Karissa Kruse, the President of the Sonoma County Wingrowers, and Doug Beretta from Beretta Family Organic Dairy.

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Carl’s Excellent Adventure: Leadership Santa Rosa Part 1

I recently began my two-year participation in Leadership Santa Rosa, an “educational program intended to develop and equip effective community leaders via exposure to pertinent issues, broad thinkers and the richness of Santa Rosa and Sonoma County.” The program was created by the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce and as a part of Class XXXII, I hope to join the distinguished group of community leaders who have graduated from the program over the years, including TLCD Architecture’s own Don Tomasi (Class VIII) and Jason Brabo (Class XXIV). Through a series of full-day educational and interactive seminars, I will learn directly from experienced leaders about various aspects of our community including challenges we face and opportunities for our future.

mushrooms, gourmet mushrooms, mycopia, leadership santa rosaThe topic for our first program day was “Agriculture” and our first official activity was a tour of Gourmet Mushrooms, a mushroom farm off of Gravenstein Highway north of Sebastopol. Justin Reyes, the Manager for Sales and Marketing, led us on a tour through the facility where they grow seven varieties of gourmet mushrooms that are sold under the Mycopia brand at groceries throughout the United States, including our local Safeway, Raley’s, and Whole Foods. The mushrooms are grown in bottles packed with a special wood based substrate that is first “seeded” with mycelium, then incubated for several months, and finally moved to harvest rooms where the mushrooms grow. Their mushrooms have been certified organic and their operations are highly sustainable, including using very little water and producing very little waste. All of their used wood substrate is sold to local farms for compost and the approximately 1 million bottles in circulation at the facility are continuously reused.

Mushroom Mycelial Biomass, mushrooms, gourmet mushrooms, leadership santa rosa

Photo courtesy of Gourmet Mushrooms, Inc.

The tour was incredibly fascinating and I learned a lot more than I ever thought I would while wearing a hairnet. I can’t wait to see what other experiences this journey will bring and I promise to keep sharing them with you! For now, I’ll leave you with a few fun facts about mushrooms:

  • The largest living organism on Earth is a mushroom in Oregon that is over 2,000 acres and can be seen from space.
  • Fungi are their own kingdom, but they are closer to animals than plants.
  • Nearly all plants have a symbiotic relationship with a partner fungi.

Stay tuned for more in my Leadership Santa Rosa Series – there are a lot more adventures to come!

To learn more about the farm Gourmet Mushrooms, Inc. watch this video.

TLCD Architecture: Revit Tips for July

Revit, TLCD Architecture

Relinquish All Elements by Carl Servais

RevitEach time you synchronize with central, make sure you relinquish all the worksets and elements that you have been working on by checking all of the available check boxes in the dialog box.  Each time you create a new view, you have created a new workset and you may not even realize that you have ownership of that workset.  If you don’t have the “View Worksets” item checked, you will not relinquish that workset, which means everyone else is locked out of editing that view.  If you close the file without relinquishing worksets or elements, it can be a real hassle for other folks to work in that model if/when they need to edit something that you own.  In summary, make it a habit to glance at those check boxes before you click “OK.”

Wishlist & Bug Report by David Moyer

Merry Christmas…I know it is only July, but it’s never too early to make your list for Santa or Autodesk.Revit, santa, TLCD Architecture

Ever wish you could get Autodesk to finally fix that thing in Revit that drives you crazy? Whether it be unintended behavior in the program that you want to see eliminated or a new feature that you wish the program offered, you can have an impact by letting Autodesk know your desires. Where you ask can I get a hold of one of those Software Architects” and give them a piece of my mind?

Well as one might expect, direct interaction with these folks is an opportunity that is few and far between. I wonder why that might be…hmm. Anyhow they do have the following webpage where you can leave your comments, frustrations, and wish-lists for REVIT: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?siteID=123112&id=1109794

I encourage each of you to take a moment when you run across something you feel could be improved in the program and leave a comment at the above website. When the same comments come from multiple sources they will pay more attention than if these comments only come from a few of us.

Microsoft Word - 2015July.docxNot good enough you say! I have no idea if I have been heard! Well I agree and so do the good folks over at AUGI (Autodesk User Group International).  This is an independent group of Autodesk users which Autodesk has recognized as representing you and your architectural computing needs. AUGI maintains a wish-list for REVIT that gives us a unified voice with the power of the entire AEC community behind it to help Autodesk develop our software with the features we need.

Not only does AUGI present this list to Autodesk on a regular basis they ask that we rank these wishes so Autodesk will know which are the most important ones to get into the software. You can find the AUGI REVIT Wish-list here: https://www.augi.com/wishlist

Revit, Designer, TLCD ArchitectureJoining AUGI as a Basic Member is free and you will be able to see that other users may be having the same issues with REVIT that you have – how they may be working around these items, and what they think would be the best way to improve the software to eliminate such problems.

Now all of you be nice and give Autodesk your input and maybe, just maybe we will have a Merry REVIT 2017 release come Next Year.

Funky Schedule and Simpson Resources by Leslie Smith

Funky Schedule

We had an issue with certain components not showing up in the room/furniture schedule. They were visible in the views and the component properties all looked good. The project has multiple phases with demo of existing (demo’d in new construction phase) and new work (in new construction phase) typical of how we do it.

It turns out that the existing walls that were being demolished were interfering with the family’s ability to associate to the new room. Even though the room displayed correctly and graphically everything looked ok in the views, the items were not showing in the schedule. After some trial & error, the fix was to uncheck the room bounding checkbox in the demo’d wall properties. Then the components all showed up in the schedule.

Since we had no existing/demo items scheduled, this worked well. Not necessarily the perfect fix…but in this case it worked.

Simpson Resource

Simpson Strongtie has both Revit Models 3D and Detail Components 2D. These can be downloaded individually or a zip of all the 2D or 3Dfamilies…From the webpage http://www.strongtie.com/ go to the “Resources” tab, “Drawings”, “Revit Drawings.”

TLCD Architecture, Strongtie

Select desired download…be aware that the Masterformat keynote number is not automatically associated.

Strongtie, TLCD Architecture

Overriding Consultant Model Colors Using Filters by Carl Servais

Have you ever received a Revit file from a consultant, linked it into your model, and then found many of the consultant’s model elements are colored something other than black?Revit, TLCD Architecture

Often times, the color can be difficult to change, because it might be an override from the consultant’s model, or it might be an object style in the consultant’s model, or it might be something else entirely.  You don’t want to open the consultant’s model and make changes to their model because it might take a while for you to discover the cause of the color change, and you will have to make all of those changes again when you get an updated model from the consultant.  You might ask the consultant to change their model, but then they might have a reason for using the colors.  In my opinion, the best solution is to let the consultant do their thing and fix the problem on my end by using a view filter.  A view filter works because it falls high enough on the element visibility override hierarchy within Revit to overcome any settings that are coming from the consultant’s model, and it is applied to a view, so you don’t have to override each element.  In fact, if you use the view filter in a view template, you can control the visibility of multiple views from one place.  Here’s how to create a view filter:

Open the Visibility/Graphic Overrides for the view you are working.  Click on the Filters tab and click on the Add button:

Microsoft Word - 2015July.docx

Click the Edit/New button to create a new Filter:

TLCD Architecture, Revit, View Filter

Create a new filter, give it a name, and then select all of the element categories that you want this filter to apply to.  For example, if you are overriding a mechanical/plumbing model, select all the ducting and piping categories:

TLCD Architecture, View Filter, Revit

This might take a bit of trial and error if you find that you did not get all of the categories that your consultant is using in their model.  Here’s the categories I used on a recent project:

Revit, TLCD Architecture

Now you just click “OK” to create the filter, and you just need to highlight your newly created filter in the “Add Filters” dialog box and click “OK”:

TLCD Architecture, Revit

Now you should be back in the “Visibility/Graphics Overrides” and you should have your filter in the list.  Now you need to tell Revit how you would like to override the elements.  Select the Projection/Surface, Lines, “Override” button:

Revit, TLCD Architecture

Override the color to black and click OK:

TLCD Architecture, Revit

Back in the “Visibility/Graphics Overrides” dialog box, when you click OK, you should see the colored elements turn black:

Revit, TLCD Architecture

Keep in mind, this only fixes the view you have been working in.  You will have to apply this filter to all the views that have colored elements showing up.  Use View Templates to provide control over similar views, like interior elevations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Improving Mental Health Care in Sonoma County

A small but important TLCD Architecture project was featured in an article, ‘County Overhauling Mental Health Services for Those in Crisis’ in today’s Press Democrat. The Sonoma County Crisis Stabilization Unit is a new facility that will replace the existing, outdated facility currently housed in the old Sonoma County (recently Sutter) Community Hospital complex on Chanate Road.

The Crisis Stabilization Unit will expand and improve the County’s emergency mental health services which treat 4500 clients each year. This new, larger facility located at The Lakes business park in west Santa Rosa will be more accessible to the clients they serve and visible to the community. In addition to providing services to adults, it will also provide much needed services to adolescents who are currently among the most underserved in the North Bay mental health care community. Project Manager Jason Brabo, Project Architect Carl Servais, Project Captain Julie Wycoff and Interior Designer Domenica Sheets are the project team.

The 15,000 sf unit is a Tenant Improvement in an existing business park and has been designed to meet the specific needs of the clients and staff. It will serve those who come in on a voluntary basis as well as those who arrive involuntarily or by law enforcement and will provide a calm, clean and welcoming place for them to access treatment.

Inside the Aurora Santa Rosa Hospital. TLCD Architecture recently completed renovations at this mental health hospital in Santa Rosa, CA. The finishes selected create a warm, welcoming atmosphere conducive to healing. The same design approach is being used in the Sonoma County Crisis Stabilization Unit.

Inside the Aurora Santa Rosa Hospital. TLCD Architecture recently completed renovations at this mental health hospital in Santa Rosa, CA. The finishes selected create a warm, welcoming atmosphere conducive to healing. The same design approach is being used in the Sonoma County Crisis Stabilization Unit.

The Crisis Stabilization Unit is the second mental health services project TLCD has worked on – the first being the recently completed 95-bed Aurora Santa Rosa Hospital, mentioned in the article.

Mental health facilities present a wide range of design challenges and requirements. Clients need a safe and secure place in which to be treated where they cannot harm themselves or others, and the built environment should support that. Staff also need to be able to observe and monitor clients at all times. The finishes play a large role in creating a warm and welcoming environment while also being durable. The right finishes and color palette can help create a hospitality feel rather than an “institutional” feel. Natural lighting is used as much as possible because evidence has shown that natural light helps balance moods and aids the healing and recovery process. As Stephen Parsons, client case manager at the facility noted in the article, “It will be the kind of place where people who walk in will feel welcome.”

TLCD’s design team has worked closely with the Crisis Stabilization Unit care providers to create a space that will greatly improve emergency mental health care for Sonoma County residents. The work is interesting, complex and challenging. It is also very satisfying to know that the work we do will help improve care for some of the most vulnerable people in our community.

TLCD getting their hands dirty

TLCD crew

You don’t often go out on a Saturday morning in January and think to yourself, “Did I need to put sunscreen on this morning?”  But that’s what I found myself doing a couple Saturday’s ago with a crew of folks from the AIA Redwood Empire, including four from TLCD Architecture; Nick Diggins, Peter Levelle, Ron Starkey (Marina‘s husband), and myself.  We spent the better part of that Saturday working on the second of five houses to be built at the Woodland Hills project in Cotati for Habitat for Humanity of Sonoma County.  We were split into two groups, one crew building a wood fence and the other crew placing sand and pavers for the driveway.  I think I speak for the whole group when I say we put in a lot of hard work, and we also had a lot of fun that day.  It’s very rewarding at the end of the day to see the fruits of your labor in something as beautiful as a rustic driveway of pavers, or a fresh wood fence.  It’s even more rewarding to know that your labor has helped provide a home for a deserving family in your community.

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